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Art Exhibitions


As part of its expansion and renovation, LAX has transformed many of its public spaces into art spaces by featuring temporary art exhibitions and installations throughout the airport. Presented in partnership with the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, LAX features 11 exhibition sites located in Terminals 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and Tom Bradley International Terminal.

Current Exhibitions

 Terminal 2 Departures Atrium Flow and Glimpse-sm
Flow and Glimpse, Barbara Strasen
Photo credit: Panic Studio LA

Terminal 2, Departures Atrium 
Flow and Glimpse  
By Barbara Strasen 
(Open to the public)

Flow and Glimpse depicts the rich textures and diversity of Los Angeles, providing a fresh view of the city and its relationship to contemporary life. Situated in the terminal’s atrium, on the publicly accessible side of the security checkpoint, this large-scale installation features 90 lenticular panels, so that the visible images change in response to the location of the viewer, providing an engaging and dynamic experience for travelers as they move through security. Each panel juxtaposes two images – one featuring a flow of textures and the other a detailed and diverse glimpse of L.A. –organized thematically on six walls of the atrium. The lenticular lenses are carefully choreographed, with the texture of the flow images uniting the different groups, while the fleeting glimpse images move along according to theme and context, in a way that suggests a dialogue among them, inviting the viewer to discover connections between seemingly dissimilar images.

Elevate 
Elevate, Joyce Dallal
Photo credit: Panic Studio LA

Terminal 3, Departures Atrium 
Elevate 
By Joyce Dallal 
(Open to the public)  

Elevate transforms the terminal’s atrium in dramatic fashion, surrounding travelers as they approach security with two bird-like formations of paper airplanes suspended in flight. This visually stunning installation consists of hundreds of colorful and seemingly delicate paper airplanes, handmade from Japanese paper and imprinted with excerpts from the Third (1929) and Fourth (1949) Geneva Conventions, international treaties addressing the treatment of civilians and prisoners during war. Interspersed among these are white paper planes printed with the text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), which details fundamental rights for all peoples. Echoing the power and fragility of these accumulations of words, the paper airplanes simultaneously recall military formations and flocks of birds spiraling upward. They reference the Japanese tradition of folding one thousand origami cranes for luck, long life, and peace.

Douglas Fir Reclaimed
Douglas Fir Reclaimed, Pontus Willfors
Photo credit: PanicStudio L.A

Terminal 3, Arrivals Hallway, Baggage Claim 
Douglas Fir Reclaimed 
By Pontus Willfors
(Open to the public)  

Pontus Willfors created Douglas Fir Reclaimed from 405 two-by-four planks of Douglas fir that were reclaimed from a teardown in Los Angeles. Willfors vertically mounted the boards of varying lengths, side by side, creating a long plane of wood against the wall. With the timbers assembled as a giant, 90-foot wooden canvas, a life-size image of a Douglas fir tree is visible across the surface, horizontally stretching the expanse of the wall. As part of his ongoing investigation into nature and culture, Willfors sanded, shaped, and carved the top surface of the aged lumber to present an image of the planks’ origin, the Douglas fir tree, as a way to connect the construction material to the tree. The installation is Willfors’ attempt to see not only the beauty of the tree, but the material: the knots, the aging in the lines, the hardness, and its common utilization for construction. The individual boards are almost impossible to visually recognize as a tree, but once the sanded parts reveal the fresh wood and the tree image emerges from the surface, one can begin to link the processes of nature and art.

Laurel Canyon, Chapparral Habitat: Native Flora and Fauna
Laurel Canyon, Chapparral Habitat: Native Flora and Fauna, Cathy Weiss
Photo credit: PanicStudio L.A

Terminal 3, Arrivals Hallway, Baggage Claim 
Laurel Canyon, Chapparral Habitat: Native Flora and Fauna
By Cathy Weiss
(Open to the public)  

Cathy Weiss’ site-specific installation of large-scale, boldly colored woodcut prints in Laurel Canyon, Chaparral Habitat: Native Flora and Fauna, celebrates Los Angeles’ indigenous habitat and the importance native plants play in creating a working ecosystem. Laurel Canyon is a community in the Santa Monica Mountains that is home to an abundance of vegetation and wild animals, including red-tailed hawks, deer, coast live oaks, and black walnut trees. Noting the striking proximity of untamed beauty to the city, Weiss created twelve “double portraits,” a wild animal paired with a native plant species, in large-format, colorful woodcut prints on mulberry paper in two large display cases. The woodcut prints feature Weiss’ characteristic intricate detailing, producing imagery that is simultaneously delicate and intense. In a smaller third case, Weiss suspended graceful rayon paper matilija poppies that appear to float against an adjacent mural stenciled with flowers and birds.

Helios
Helios, Shingo Francis
Guest curated by Koán Jeff Baysa
Photo credit: PanicStudio L.A

Terminal 3, Ticketing 
Helios 
By Shingo Francis
Guest curated by Koán Jeff Baysa 
(Open to the public)  

Ancient Greeks worshipped the god Helios who drove the blazing chariot of the sun across the sky each day. At 30,000 feet above the earth, air travelers have privileged vantage points from which to witness spectacular skies, sunrises, and sunsets. Inspired by the evolving skyscapes that he witnessed during his frequent travels between Japan and the United States, Francis uses a painting technique of layering pigment and medium that allows light to reflect back from the underlying surface, thus activating a range of sublime colors. These abstract paintings reference the transitory nature of air travel as the viewer is immersed in vast horizons of light and dark.

Camelot
Camelot, Deborah Aschheim
Photo credit: PanicStudio L.A

Tom Bradley International Terminal, Customs Hallway, Arrivals Level  
Camelot 
By Deborah Aschheim
(On view for ticketed passengers)  

Deborah Aschheim’s site-specific installation titled Camelot contains large-scale, glowing white sculptures inspired by personal memory, architecture, and the constantly changing nature of cities. Featuring a mash-up of urban architecture from around the world, Aschheim created a “dreamscape” of intentionally modified, out-of-scale, hybridized, torn-down, or never-built buildings that give form to the imagined mental state of a disoriented international traveler. Her artwork attempts to respond to the state of mind of passengers who are arriving after a long flight, possibly processing the sensations of multiple cities visited. For Aschheim, the traveler is in a kind of limbo, a state of mind that the artist considers dreamlike and poetic. Hand-sculpted out of Coroplast corrugated plastic, coated with a translucent acrylic that gives the sculptures a ghostly finish, and illuminated from within using varying shades of white LED light, the resulting sculptures appear mysterious and hazy, as if existing between the actual world and a mythical universe.

Tathatā
Tathatā, Randall Von Bloomberg
Photo credit: PanicStudio L.A

Terminal 7 and 8, Departures Hallway  
Tathatā  
By Randall Von Bloomberg 
(On view for ticketed passengers)  

Tathata is a Sanskrit word that expresses the profound awareness and appreciation of reality within each single moment of life. Tathata is often revealed in the seemingly mundane, such as observing the sun illuminating an asphalt road, or noticing the blowing wind along a grassy parkway. Randall Von Bloomberg is inspired by the urban landscape around him, in particular, the trees and plant forms that thrive around freeways and other man-made structures. His dense and layered landscape paintings attempt to magnify and translate the random, fleeting, and beautiful urban moments into expriences of Tathata for viewers.

 

About Los Angeles World Airports Art Program
The mission of the LAWA Art Program is to enhance and humanize the travel experience by providing diverse and memorable art experiences throughout the airport. The Art Program includes temporary exhibitions, permanent installations, and cultural performances. With an emphasis on local and regional artists, the Art Program provides access to an array of contemporary artworks that reflect and celebrate the region’s creative caliber. For additional information, please visit www.lawa.org.

About Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)
LAX is the fifth busiest airport in the world and second in the United States.  LAX served nearly 70.7 million passengers in 2014.  LAX offers 692 daily nonstop flights to 85 cities in the U.S. and 928 weekly nonstop flights to 67 cities in 34 countries on 59 commercial air carriers.  LAX ranks 14th in the world and fifth in the U.S. in air cargo tonnage processed, with over two million tons of air cargo valued at nearly $96.3 billion.  An economic study in 2011 reported that operations at LAX generated 294,400 jobs in Los Angeles County with labor income of $13.6 billion and economic output of more than $39.7 billion.  This activity added $2.5 billion to local and state revenues.  LAX is part of a system of three Southern California airports – along with LA/Ontario International and Van Nuys general aviation – that are owned and operated by Los Angeles World Airports, a proprietary department of the City of Los Angeles that receives no funding from the City’s general fund.
 

For more information about LAX, please visit www.lawa.aero/lax or follow on Twitter @flyLAXAirport, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LAInternationalAirport, and on YouTube at www.YouTube.com/laxairport1. Information about LAX’s ongoing multi-billion-dollar LAX Modernization Program as well as tips and shortcuts to help navigate LAX during construction are available at www.LAXisHappening.com.

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